Munich Agreement 1938 Wiki

After the summit, British Prime Minister Chamberlain returned to Britain, where he declared that the Munich Agreement meant “peace for our time” after his success in capturing Austria in Germany in March 1938, Adolf Hitler looked forward to Czechoslovakia, where about three million people were of German descent in the Sudetenland. In April, he discussed with Wilhelm Keitel, head of the high command of the Bundeswehr, the political and military aspects of Case Green, the code name for the Sudetenland acquisition project. A surprising rush of “clear skies without any cause or justification” was rejected, as the result would have been “a hostile opinion of the world that could lead to a critical situation”. Decisive action would therefore take place only after a period of political turmoil on the part of the Germans within Czechoslovakia, accompanied by diplomatic quarrels which, if they became more serious, would be either an apology for the war or grounds for a blitz after an “incident” of German creation. In addition, disruptive political activities had been under way in Czechoslovakia since October 1933, when Konrad Henlein founded the German Sudetenland Internal Front. In early November 1938, after the First Prize of LaViet, after the failure of negotiations between Czechoslovakia and Hungary, as a recommendation to settle territorial disputes by the annex of the Munich Agreement, the German-Italian arbitration demanded that Czechoslovakia be ceded to southern Slovakia and a third of the Slovak territory to Hungary, and soon after, Poland obtained shortly after time , regardless of each other, small territorial departures (Zaolzie). The Munich Agreement (Czech: Mnichovska dohoda); in Slovak: Mnechovska dohoda; in German: Munchner Abkommen) or Munchner Verrat (Czech: Mnichovska zrada; The Slovak: Mnechovska zrada) was an agreement reached on 30 September 1938 in Munich by Nazi Germany, the United Kingdom, the Third French Republic and the Kingdom of Italy. It granted Germany the “transfer of the German territory of the Sudetenland” from Czechoslovakia. [1] Most of Europe celebrated the agreement because it prevented the war threatened by Adolf Hitler by allowing the annexation of the Sudetenland by Nazi Germany, a region of Western Czechoslovakia inhabited by more than 3 million people, mainly German-speaking. Hitler declared that this was his last territorial claim in Europe, and the choice seemed to lie between war and appeasement. Since most of the border areas are in the area ceded under the Munich Agreement, the rest of Czechoslovakia, despite its relatively large reserves of modern armaments, was totally open to further invasions. In a speech to the Reichstag, Hitler spoke of the importance of the occupation for the strengthening of the German army and said: That Germany, occupying Czechoslovakia, won 2,175 rifles and cannons, 469 tanks, 500 pieces of anti-aircraft artillery, 43,000 machine guns, 1,090,000 military rifles, 114,000 pistols, about one billion small arms and three million rounds of ammunition.

This could arm about half of the Wehrmacht. [93] Czechoslovakian weapons later played an important role in the German conquest of Poland and France, the latter of which had pushed Czechoslovakia to capitulate to the Sudetenland in 1938. On 28 and 29 April 1938, Daladier met in London with British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain to discuss the situation.